Vis wz. 35
9mm pistolet Vis wz. 35 (9mm Pistol Vis Model 35) is a Polish semiautomatic pistol designed in 30ties for Polish Armed Forces. Oficially this gun was designed by Piotr Wilniewczyc and Jan Skrzypiński, but propably pistol was designed by Piotr Wilniewczyc and Feliks Modzelewski. In lata 20ties exist studying about new pistol for Polish Armed Forces. Initially Polish consider buy license for Czechoslavakian CZ 28 pistol, but later Polish decide that Browning HP should be entered to use in Polish Armed Forces. In 1929 Browning HP was accepted by Polish weapon comitette, but finally was accepted Piotr Wilniewczyc and PWU (Polska Wytwórnia Uzbrojenia, Polish Weapon Factory) proposition about designed a Polish pistol. First prototype was designed in 1931 in PWU, initially pistol was named WIS (Wilniewczyc and Skrzypiński). After Polish Weapon Department decision pistol designation was changed to Vis ("Power" in latin). Pistol based on M1911 and Browning HP. First prototypes has long, non telescope recoil spring guide, and takedown lever doubles as safety. Takedown lever was used to lock slide in position to field strip and in safety position. In safety position hammer can not hit firing pin. In 1932 were produced test series, test series pistol has Vis wz. 32 designation. Vis wz. 32 has takewdown lever which was used to lock slide in field stripped position. First prototype pistols and Vis wz. 32 pistols has not decocker. Mass production Vis wz. 35 pistol was entered to use in Polish Armed Forces in 1936. On west Vis pistols is commonly known as "Radom" and "Polish Eagle".
Vis wz. 35 design
Vis wz. 35 is a short recoil operated locked-breech pistol with a cam shaped below the barrel. Locking is accomplished by two lugs on the barrel above ejection port. Recoil spring on a long, telescope spring guide is located beneath the barrel. Telescope spring guide allowed turn back slide when pistol breakdown on ground (for more safety). This gun has a single action trigger mechanism with an exposed hammer. Vis is equipped with decocker located on the left side of a slide. When decocker was used, firing pin go to front position (but not hit primer), and hammer was released. Decocker was added especially for Polish kavalry. The pistol does not have manual safety. On rear side of grip is mounted manual safety, under grip safety is located a slot for detachable shoulder stock. The stock was never issued with the gun. Vis is chambered for 9x19mm Parabellum (Luger) cartridge, and is fed from 8-round single column magazine located in the pistol grip. On left and right side of magazine is located small 7 cuts. Magazine latch is located on the left side of the frame near the trigger guard, and in front of it there is the slide catch lever. The takedown lever is also located on the left side of the frame just behind the grip panel. Its purpose is to simplify field stripping. On left side of grip is located plastic panel with "FB" (Fabryka Broni, Weapon Factory) mark in triangle. On right side of grip is located "Vis" mark in triangle. Pistol has open, fixed sights mounted on the slide. Vis is reliable, accurate, strong, and ergonomic. From 1936 to 1939 40 000 Vis wz.35 pistols were made for the Polish army.
Other Vis version
Vis wz. 32 pistol (Courtesy of Paweł Rozdżestwieński)
Vis wz. 32 is a test series weapon with long, non telescope recoil spring guide. Pistol have takedown lever which was used to lock slide in position to field stripped. Pistol is not equipped with dockecker. This version never entered mass production. Today the only Vis wz. 32 is on display at the Lubuskie Muzeum Wojskowe (Lubusz Military Museum) in Drzonow


.45ACP caliber variant of the Vis was a prototype designed for export. This gun was tested in Argentina. Today no copies of Vis .45ACP exist


Polish designers attempted to create a machine pistol with a large capacity magazine and detachable shoulder stock based on standard Vis wz. 35 pistol. Machine pistol version never entered mass production. Today no copies of the machine pistol based on Vis exist


In Hungarian Army Museum exist Vis wz. 35 which was redesigned for .22LR cartridge. Pistol is equipped with .22LR barrel, and standard magazine for 9x19mm Parabellum cartridge. This is a one shot pistol. After shot shooter must manually repeating slide, because standard Vis slide is to heavy for .22LR cartridge. Pistol use standard trigger mechanism and standard firing mechanism. This gun was not entered to mass production, this is a custom pistol dessigned by user


In Radom Factory in 1939 was designed .22 Short insertion barrel for Vis wz. 35 pistol. Pistol based on 9x19mm Parabellum cartridge look-alike inserts. Before shooting shooter must add .22 Short cartridges to inserts and mount on rear side of inserts covers with firing pins (insert cover is equipped with firing pin). After shot firing pin in pistol slide hit firing pin in insert cover, and firing pin in insert cover hit rear side of cartridge. Pistol use standard magazine for 9x19mm cartridge. After shot shooter must manually repeating slide, because slide is to heavy for .22 Short cartridge. Insertion barrel for .22 Short cartridge and insert was not entered to mass production
Vis in German use
German production 3 grade Vis wz. 35
The Vis pistol was produced in Poland during Nazi occupation. The German army used Vis wz. 35 pistol as P-35(p). 315 000 Vis pistols in 4 grades were made for German army. Pistols from grade 1 to grade 3 were made by the Radom factory in Poland, while grade 4 pistols were made by Steyr in Austria. During the occupation the Radom factory did not produce barrels for Vis pistols in order to make it difficult for Polish resistance to assemble guns from stolen parts. Pistols from grades 2, 3 and 4 have long, non telescope, long recoil spring guide, and not have a slot for the detachable stock. Pistols from grades 3 and 4 also don't have a takedown latch, but in this pistols hammer has doubles as takedown latch. Shooter can be use hammer to lock slide in position to field strip. The Magazine from grade 4 pistols use the follower from the Walther P38 pistol.
After WWII
After WWII Vis not manufactured. Polish Army adopted Soviet TT pistol use, which was later replaced by the Polish P-64 "CZAK" and P-83 "Wanad" pistols. In the early 90s the Radom factory produced a short collectors' series of Vis wz. 35. The Vis pistols from the 90s production were offered for 1000 dollars.
version
Vis wz. 35
cartridge
9x19mm Parabellum
muzzle velocity
345m/s
muzzle energy
446J
barrel lenght
120mm
lenght
176mm
witdh
32mm
height
135mm
weight
950g without magazine

1135 with full load 8 rounds magazine
magazine
single column 8 rounds magazine
Vis wz. 35 with slide in rear position
Field stripped Vis wz. 35
Vis wz. 35. Specimen shown below has been converted to a custom airgun (Courtesy of Jacek Borkowski)
Airgun based on Vis wz. 35 (Jacek Borkowski)
Airgun based on Vis wz. 35 (Jacek Borkowski)
Airgun based on Vis wz. 35 (Jacek Borkowski)
Airgun based on Vis wz. 35 (Jacek Borkowski)
Airgun based on Vis wz. 35 (Jacek Borkowski)
Airgun based on Vis wz. 35 (Jacek Borkowski)
Airgun based on Vis wz. 35 (Jacek Borkowski)
Airgun based on Vis wz. 35 (Jacek Borkowski)
Airgun based on Vis wz. 35 (Jacek Borkowski)
Airgun based on Vis wz. 35 (Jacek Borkowski)
Airgun based on Vis wz. 35 (Jacek Borkowski)
Slide catch lever from airgun based on Vis wz. 35 (Jacek Borkowski)
Barrel from airgun based on Vis wz. 35 (Jacek Borkowski)
Airgun based on Vis wz. 35 (Jacek Borkowski)
Frame from airgun based on Vis wz. 35 (Jacek Borkowski)
Slide from airgun based on Vis wz. 35 (Jacek Borkowski)
Airgun based on Vis wz. 35 (Jacek Borkowski)
Airgun based on Vis wz. 35 (Jacek Borkowski)
Recoil spring from airgun based on Vis wz. 35 (Jacek Borkowski)
Airgun based on Vis wz. 35 (Jacek Borkowski)
Airgun based on Vis wz. 35 (Jacek Borkowski)
Airgun based on Vis wz. 35 (Jacek Borkowski)
Magazine from airgun based on Vis wz. 35 (Jacek Borkowski)